Fifty for the Future Updates

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Page 8 of 16
October 07, 2016

AVAILABLE NOW! Five new string quartets from Kronos’ Fifty for the Future

As of today, you can now learn to play new string quartets written by Ken Benshoof, Nicole Lizée, Kala Ramnath, Tanya Tagaq, and Merlijn Twaalfhoven! Scores and parts, recordings, and additional learning materials are now available on our website, free of charge.

Commissioned for Fifty for the Future: The Kronos Learning Repertoire, these join previously released works by Franghiz Ali-Zadeh, Fodé Lassana Diabaté, Garth Knox, Aleksandra Vrebalov, and Wu Man. When completed in 2020, this collection will feature 50 new works composed by an eclectic, international group of 25 female and 25 male composers. Kronos’ Fifty for the Future is devoted to the most contemporary approaches to the string quartet and designed expressly for the training of students and emerging professionals.

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October 03, 2016

Kronos’ Fifty for the Future at UCLA

We’re headed to Los Angeles this week for a residency at the Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA, a Legacy Partner of Kronos’ Fifty for the Future! We are deeply honored to join SITI Company Anne Bogart, Robert Wilson and Laurie Anderson as a CAP UCLA Artist Fellow, a program “dedicated to celebrating masters of their craft.”

If you’re in LA, we’ll be performing at UCLA Royce Hall on Friday at 8PM, the same day we release materials for the next five Fifty for the Future compositions. The first half of the concert will feature new works commissioned from Scottish violist Garth Knox, Trio Da Kali’s balafon player Fodé Lassana Diabaté, Inuit throat singer Tanya Tagaq, Azerbaijani contemporary composer Franghiz Ali-Zadeh, Canada’s “brilliant musical scientist” Nicole Lizée, and Indian violin virtuoso Kala Ramnath for Kronos’ Fifty for the Future education initiative.

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September 19, 2016

Philip Glass to Receive National Medal of Arts

We are thrilled to congratulate Philip Glass—longtime friend and collaborator of Kronos, and one of Kronos’ Fifty for the Future composers—on his 2015 National Medal of Arts! President Barack Obama will present the awards at the White House in conjunction with the National Humanities Medals this Thursday, September 22. The event will be live streamed at

The National Medal of Arts citations recognize “Philip Glass for his groundbreaking contributions to music and composition. One of the most prolific, inventive, and influential artists of our time, he has expanded musical possibility with his operas, symphonies, film scores, and wide-ranging collaborations.” Congratulations to Philip on this well-deserved honor!

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September 14, 2016

Rhiannon Giddens Wins Banjo Award

Last weekend, it was announced that Rhiannon Giddens, a Year One composer for Kronos’ Fifty for the Future, would be awarded this year’s Steve Martin Prize for Excellence in Banjo and Bluegrass. The board, which includes Mr. Martin along with other banjo stars like Bela Fleck and Tony Trischka, decided unanimously to grant Giddens the prize, as she is “eminently qualified, and we want to have the banjo world and the wider world know that it is a diverse instrument with many different styles.”

Our congratulations to Ms. Giddens on this tremendous award! We could not be more thrilled to have her on our Fifty for the Future team, and we can’t wait to perform with her in Austin, TX next week.

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September 12, 2016

Wonderful Weekend at DePauw University

Much gratitude to everyone who came out to our DePauw University concert on Saturday! It was thrilling to premiere The Journey of the Horizontal People, Raven Chacon‘s new piece for Kronos’ Fifty for the Future, and such a treat to perform as part of DePauw’s 21CMposium (Commissioning Partner), an inspiring event with incredibly thoughtful artists and educators. We love that 21CM is reimagining how the next generation of musicians might be trained for a musical landscape that continues to face a difficult paradox: as music becomes more easily accessible and ubiquitous, it is becoming harder and harder for many musicians to make a living at their art while following traditional paths.


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